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Richie Owens & The Farm Bureau Host Listening Party Tuesday

Richie Owens & The Farm Bureau
Host Listening Party Tuesday
 
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Celebrating the release of their new album, In Farm We Trust, Richie Owens & The  Farm Bureau will host a Listening Party at 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25 at The Blue Bar (1911 Broadway).
Then at 9:00 p.m., the group will perform as part of The Billy Block Show at The Rutledge (410 4th Ave. S).
 
Fans of 80s Nashville rock will remember Owens and guitarist Robert Ocker from the tense, modern sounds of The Movement, but the East Tennessee natives have pursued a rootsier, more acoustic sound for well over a decade now. As The Farm Bureau, Owens plays banjo, mandolin and harmonica, while Ocker trades between his acoustic and lap steel guitars, with vocalist Rebecca Seaver adding harmony to Owens’ lead. They play spiked-up mountain music and melodic, sweet-toned originals that show off Owens’ melodic and lyrical know-how.
 
"After serving as part of the backbone of his cousin Dolly Parton’s backing band, Richie Owens launches a long overdue solo career with his impressive new album. Boasting a broad array of musical references, it runs a wide gamut—from rock to country and from blues to bluegrass – yet still manages to flow together seamlessly. 'My music combines a variety of traditional and contemporary elements, whether it’s folk or roots or rock ‘n’ roll,' he notes in his bio. 'It can encompass a pretty broad spectrum. Some may see it as falling under the umbrella of Americana, but in fact, its minded from a very specific Southern sensibility.'
 
"We couldn’t have said it better ourselves. In fact, In Farm We Trust shows his ability to effectively integrate these influences, whether its his revved take on the traditional tune “Rye Whiskey,” the emphatic stomp of “Indian Blues” or the reverberating rocker “Mountain Girl,” a song which sounds remarkably similar to a Tom Petty outtake. Other tracks prove equally infections, from the dark sinewy groove of “Why Can’t I Leave” to the reverberating refrain of “Life on the Farm” and on to the assured embrace of “Give Me Strength.” To take a hint from the title, In Owens we can trust as well."
— NoDepression
 
SEE YOU THERE!

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